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Randy Barbato and Fenton Bailey’s Inside Deep Throat

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In 1972, the pornographic industry focused on pleasuring only male audiences without even considering women’s needs. It wasn’t until the daring film, Deep Throat, was released into theatres that people acknowledged a woman’s sexuality. The documentary Inside Deep Throat explores the films impact on society and its long lasting effect on the porn industry.

Deep Throat tells the story of a woman who can’t find her “itch”. She’s had sex, and just doesn’t understand its appeal, until she discovers how to achieve an orgasm. This strange technique is what made her such a huge star, not just on screen, but also in the bedroom. She rose to pornographic stardom so quickly that no one seemed to even question her overall feelings toward the career, or her home life. The film goes into great detail of her family members opinions on the subject and the importance of the film as a whole. It was such a racy film since it was the first porno to focus on women’s pleasure, and even acknowledge the female orgasm. Most films finished once the male received pleasure, however, Deep Throat showed that women are just as important. This was extremely controversial considering the time, however was revolutionary in the industry. Linda Lovelace soon became one of the most iconic porn stars and is still recognizable today.

In my opinion, the overall film was extremely informative and has allowed me to see the porn industry in a whole new light. It is a much bigger force in our society than I thought, and can define our time. Porn has made a drastic change since Deep Throat and has morphed into a gender mutual industry, for the most part. There is now porn sites and videos dedicated to women, which shows how women are now considered just as sexually active as men. It is sad to think that there was a time in which women could never achieve pleasure and never even knew what it felt like to orgasm. Its a privilege in life that should be accepted by everyone in society as the norm. Deep Throat has allowed many women to find their “itch” and find themselves along the way.

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Miles Forman’s Hair

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Guilty pleasures are rarely praised. They sit at the back of your mind, awaiting attention, and only get recognized during times of despair. They aren’t mentioned in conversations, but only when a person is most vulnerable, do they emerge. Hair by Milo’s Forman, is one of the biggest guilty pleasures. However, I, do not hide my love for it. A person should not be ashamed of something that allows them to feel happiness, it is a pleasure that is too often faked,  and not easy to come by.

Hair tells the story of a small town country boy, Claude Hopper, portrayed by the highly underrated actor John Savage, visiting to New York City for the first time before he joins the army. He only has three days to spend before the terror of war, and thats all he needs. He immediately befriends a group of hippies who encourage him to embrace life and friendship. He soon realizes that life can be difficult for even the most care free groups of people. Its a story that perfectly depicts life in the 60’s, and true friendship as a whole.

Oh and did I mention that its a musical? Well it is, allowing the viewer to truly enjoy the upbeat and fun loving theme. The songs, dance numbers, and overall vibe of the film leaves the viewer feeling enlightened and wanting to buy the soundtrack. I, personally, love musicals, however it could be very overbearing for those who aren’t used to incessant music numbers that lead the plot along.  As a whole, its still one of my favourite films, even if I know people cringe and laugh when I speak so fondly of it. Its a film that can make me happy at any point of my life and that is an undeniably magical trait in the world we live in.

Wim Wenders Paris, Texas

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Every once in awhile, I can come across a film that is so beautiful that it leaves me effected in one way or another. Wim Wenders Paris, Texas is a film that is worth remembering for the rest of my life. I will forever cherish the first time I watched it; the stunning visuals, the  quirky music and most of all; the words spoken that left me speechless. 

Travis Henderson is a man with nothing left to loose, literally. He abandoned his wife and child for four years, unknowing of the consequences. Found by his brother, stumbling across the dessert and brought back into the real world without a word of where he went, or why. All he had with him was a small picture of a lot in Paris, Texas, claiming that its going to be his home with his wife and child. His brother had been taking care of his son, and his wife is no where to be found. Struggling to connect with his son, he feels guilt for his absence and soon realizes what needs to be done.

The camera captures images of relationships and nature in such a way that displays their true beauty and the secrets that lay beyond. The cinematography is a main contributing factor to my love for this film. Much of the film is told through silence and moments where the viewer is encouraged to just think. Many people grow unruly and impatient with a film like this, but its beauty makes up for its lack of plot. I’m not saying that it isn’t interesting, because some of the best films are the ones that are relatable. I’d much rather watch a film thats boring, but I can relate to, rather than a film thats action packed and completely unrealistic. I love being able to take something away of a film, whether it be factual, or understanding myself as a human being. Either way, any film that leaves an after taste, is a film worth recommending.

Ingmar Bergmans Persona

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It is very rare to come across a film that can make even the most open minded person uncomfortable. Not in a way that is gruesome or grotesque in any way, but real. So utterly real that it makes your stomach turn and your mind rot. Words that are so close to reality that they surpass the vast time difference and are forever relevant. Ingmar Bergmans Persona is one of the most haunting films of all time.

Elizabeth Volger is an actress that has refused to talk and is immediately admitted into a mental hospital. Its overall atmosphere is very uncomfortable, so the doctor allows for her, and the nurse Alba, to spend time at his beach house. Alba automatically finds comfort in Elizabeths silence, for she has many secrets that are better left unsaid. She suddenly feels as though she could tell Elizabeth anything without even a glimpse of judgement. It’s an amazing feeling, and she takes advantage of her silence until it goes too far. They begin to get unruly with each others presence as their minds take over.

The moment I started this movie, I knew I’d love it. The screeching music fills your ears as you’re hypnotized by flashing images of violence and beauty. You’re forced into a world that you wished you could escape, but its unique beauty makes it impossible. Its irresistible in a way that cannot be explained, yet I ensure you it is worth it. In the end you’re left feeling naked. Stripped of your interior image, and left to cope with emotions that are better left unsaid.

Destin Daniel Cretton’s Short Term 12

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A hauntingly beautiful story of the struggles of growing up. The awkward stages, the embarrassing phases, and the unknowing of what the future will bring. Destin Daniel Cretton’s Short Term 12 is a film that has everything that you wish you could forget, and everything you wish you could remember about your childhood.

Encouraging them to grow, learn from their past mistakes, and most of all; love themselves for who they are. Grace is a supervisor at a foster care home for at-risk kids. The home allows them to grow in a safe environment, and look foreword to the future. The peace is disturbed when a new child arrives, with a past worth forgetting. Jayden is a troubled teenage girl, that hides behind sarcasm and tough exterior. She refuses to attempt to make friends, because she claims that her father will pick her up soon, so she distances herself from the other kids. Grace starts to spend time with Jayden, and realizes that they have a lot in common. Jayden slowly begins to realizes that friendship doesn’t have an expiration date, especially when its from people with the same experiences. To call it inspirational, would be an understatement. It’s a film filled with heart wrenching emotions that make you smile and laugh one minute, then cry like a baby the next.

I can honestly say that I started watching this film, having no idea what its about and expecting it to be a typical movie about the struggles of being a teenager. However, as the story blossomed, so did my feelings towards it. It wasn’t overly sad, or overdramatic to the point of being inaccurate to real life. It was realistic, as well as an amazing story. I really loved it and I’m not over exaggerating for the sake this review. I don’t write to sound good, I write because I want people to watch films that deserve attention.

This is one of many films this year that deserves more recognition. More people should see it and appreciate its beauty rather than watching all the star studded blockbusters. It will surprise them with its heartbreaking story, that is sadly more relatable that anyone would like to admit.

Jean-Luc Godard’s Vivre Sa Vie

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Jean-Luc Godard is a french filmmaker who’s work will never go out of style. His stories aren’t amazing, his cinematography isn’t perfect, the level of drama isn’t crazy, but the writing is legendary.

I can remember the first time I watched a Godard film. I remember being a little disappointed at the storyline and its lack of life, but then I read the subtitles and felt so much more. Poetry at its best, the scripts he writes take a look into a persons mind and digs out every single thing that has ever been an unspoken problem that has deprived you of sleep and happiness. He doesn’t candy coat anything, making the world an array of lies that can’t possibly have an upside, until you make it yourself. Life doesn’t suddenly get better, and the world doesn’t magically fix itself. You have to work hard to achieve anything and thats a fact. Rather than lying to his audience, he just makes them cry, thats the beauty of Jean-Luc Godard.

It tells the story of a woman named Nana who slowly becomes a prostitute. It’s filmed in 12 parts, or chapters, that create an in depth analyzes of her life and feelings. It mostly is told through conversation between her and her friends, but also through her eyes. She discusses many topics throughout the movie that can be pondered for hours without ever finding the true meaning.

When you look into her eyes you see more than just a pretty girl, you see her past, her struggle, her pain and so much more. Anna Karina can tell an entire story with just facial expressions, even if their so simplistic. She is truly one of the most talented actresses of all time and one of my favourites. She manages to look beautiful, yet tortured.

As a whole this film is beautiful. It’s beautiful in its own way, much like life and people. It doesn’t stand out of the crowd, but if you get to know it, it can make you smile.

Fredrick Bond’s The Necessary Death of Charlie Countryman

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I think its a beautiful movie. Thats it. I think its beautiful and thats all that counts, doesn’t it? Regardless of its terrible reviews and flaws that just further my argument, I think its lovely. A film doesn’t have to be perfect or consistent or shiny for everyone to see. It just needs to relate, that was its original purpose, and I think that it needs to go back to those simplistic guidelines. No I am not going to start ranting about how relatable it is or how it changed my life, because it didn’t, but that doesn’t make it any less of a good movie. It’s not that I find any character relatable, but relatable as a human. I can understand his feelings and actions, even though its so obscure.

It tells the story a man on the look for a purpose in life after his home has been destroyed. Not a home in the literal sense, but the feeling of it. The feeling of belonging somewhere, and not having to act a certain way to impress, or do anything other than whats comfortable. His mother died, and so did his home. Immediately after her passing, he has a vision where she tells him to go to Bucharest. He feels as though it is his moral duty to go there and find himself, as well as his mothers love. On the plane ride there, a man falls asleep on his shoulder and suddenly dies. Yet again he is faced with a vision where the man tells him to contact his daughter and give her a message. The moment he sees her, he’s taken aback by her beauty even during sadness and can’t help but want to learn more about her. Their relationship takes a toll when he discovers her violent husband who doesn’t approve of anything that makes her happy.

The music and overall feel of the movie is what really got me hooked. I love the feel-good vibes that are corrupted by reality. It doesn’t bullshit its way to your heart with a classic story of love, but that does’t make it any less loveable.